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Yesterday I read a post on Facebook, from a lady that had just bought her first Panerai. She had debated the purchase with her watch friends and she was hearing that the watch was not Panerai enough. It apparently did not have enough DNA as the purists say.
Good for her, she still treated herself with the 40 mm Panerai.

Panerai PAM048

Do not throw the first stone

Then I remembered that I was going to pick up my newest purchase today. And you simply won’t find a modern Panerai with more DNA than that one. And I must reflect a little bit on why.

First and foremost, I am a collector. I buy watches for several reasons, most importantly that I like them. Then there needs to be an x-factor. The collectability factor. A limitation, a historical piece, a detail on that model that doesn’t come around too often or simply that the watch speaks to me (I’ve done another piece on the subject – read it).

Now this Panerai that I am getting today ticks all the boxes. For some time now I have been looking for a Radiomir with a dial that I actually like. I am not very keen on the California dials and such.

At SIHH last year Panerai released two controversial Radiomir watches. Well, at the start they weren’t controversial, but they soon became the most discussed watches of last year. I don’t believe that Panerai really wanted the focus that came in the aftermath of the thoughts on the watches by, the eminent guru of all things Panerai, Jose Perez.

I decided I wanted one or the other. And today I got the PAM720.

Panerai Radiomir PAM 720

PAM720

This watch was on its release kind of a disappointment. It was supposed to be a replica of the 3646C, one of the earliest Panerai watches. Developed for and worn by Decima Flottiglia MAS, who was an Italian commando frogman unit during the second world war.
But the watch had the wrong hands upon its release. They were not blued like on the original 3646C. They appeared gold on all the pictures from Geneva.
The watch was then forgotten by everyone. Even the Paneristis kind of forgot this one.

Then when the watch recently hit the stores Panerai had changed the hands to the correct blued version, like on 3646C.

The backdrop of these watches involves the history of both Italian and German WW2 divers. And the controversy was actually about this war history of the manufacture.
I will not go into it in detail as Perezcope did a superb article on it.
In my opinion people should read up on their war history and their Swiss watch history before they criticise Panerai for this release. So if you don’t like these watches over some distant war history, you can suck my balls too.

I must say that I love this reedition of the 3646C. Limited to 500 pieces it is hard to come by. I also like the fact that the design is so true to its origin. The domed crystal, the beige fauxtina and the blued hands. In the Radiomir case with the onion crown it is just beautiful and pure Panerai.

Panerai Radiomir PAM 720

Panerai Radiomir PAM 720

And here I am, dissing purists.

I like purist watches. But I do not like the message that purists push about what is correct and what is not. No matter if we are talking watches or tits.

I love the PAM 684, a 42 mm gold Submersible. Any Panerai purist would frown. Right?

DISCLAIMER: Note that I am using “Panerai purist”, not “Paneristi” as I find most of them to be liberal, thoughtful and cool.

Panerai PAM684 Submersible

 

This year I attended SIHH in Geneva for the first time. It was a crazy week and I needed some distance to it before I could write about it. Being a noob in that environment is hard. What to do, were to go, who to talk to – that was my questions before I left my safe office. Thanks to a couple of hardened friends I figured out I had to be everywhere, do everything and talk to as many people as I could. And I did.

For those of you who have not been there, SIHH is a watch fair were brands unveil their novelties for the year. Dealers, journalists and VIPs join in on the fun for the whole week. I was invited by Richemont and went there as a journalist. Before I left I had a wish to see brands and watches that I have never seen or rarely see in Norway. Brands like Audemars Piguet, Kari Voutilinen, HYT, MB & F, Ulysse Nardin, Greubel Forsey, and many more, does not have a Norwegian dealer and is hard to find and study in the flesh here. The SIHH fair is also an opportunity to see and experience rare watches that I will probably never see again, like the new L’ASTRONOMO by Panerai.

Here is my list of what to remember if you decide to go to SIHH (based on hard learned experience):

DOs:

  • Learn the 3 kiss greeting – you may find a norwegian hug cozy, but it is very inappropriate.
  • Hang with a young crowd – they will often say “whaaat….you don’t look forty!” – It’s really amazing.
  • Go to Vacheron Constantin for morning coffee. They have the best barista and coffee in the building.
  • Dress nice. Remember that it is only Kristian Haagen that is allowed to wear beat up cargo pants. He’s earned it, you haven’t.

DONT’s:

  • Not everyone understand Scandinavian humour, and don’t use irony. Ever.
  • Never take off your shoes in public after a long day in the Expo hall.
  • Most important. Never drop a 1 mill EUR watch on the floor – It went well, not a scratch to the watch, but I thought for a second the lady would have a heart attack. I guess I will be banned from ever going to SIHH again.

So that’s it. Learn from a noob.

The rest will be a picture heavy feature. I always intend to give you good quality shots of watches. So it may take some time to load page.

Best of SIHH 2018

SIHH is also an overwhelming sensory experience. All the brands represent themselves with luxurious stands showcasing their watches and novelties.
From the second I entered the massive expo hall I was like a kid in a candy store. Design, artwork, food, drinks, loud music and watches just kept coming at me. Non-stop. So much fun!

Some brands had more interesting novelties than others, and I will try to give you my honest opinion on the best ones. Bare in mind that I like a classic look but I am also weak for modern madness. You’ll seewhen I expose my favorite novelty at the end of this post.

Panerai

If you followed the releases this year you may ask why Panerai is on my best of list. And you are absolutely right. They did not release anything very exciting this year. But what they did was to renew their whole base model lineup. What that means is that they decided to spend SIHH this year scrapping ebauche movements and introducing in-house movements on all their watches. I am all for that!

Also exciting is that they introduced 38 mm Luminor Due. For a smaller wrist  as they say themselves in their presskit. In Scandinavia that is a synonym for ladies. I will finally consider getting a Panerai for my wife.

IWC

Celebrating a 150th anniversary is not something you forget in the watchindustry. And IWC did not either. I had pretty high hopes for this year and I must say that I was a little disappointed at the beginning of the week. Their release was not what I had hoped for. But then I had the opportunity to spend almost an hour fondling their novelties. By the end of that hour I was sold.
What IWC did this year was to introduce lacquered dials on a wide range of their models. Pilots, Portuguese, Portofino, and Da Vinci will be seen in 12 layers of white or blue lacquer. And the new references inspired by the Pallweber pocket watches.

The Pallweber in red gold.IWC Schaffhausen Pallweber SIHH 2018

And the new perpetual calendar with the lacquer dial.IWC perpetual calendar 150th

The beautiful Annual Calendar Pilots watch.IWC Pilots annual calendar sihh 2018 blue

Jaeger LeCoultre

I guess no one could really miss the Polaris release this year. In the norwegian community it certainly stirred up the interest for Jaeger LeCoultre. I have always been a fan of vintage inspired watches, but lately there have just been too many. And as rumors started going about the Polaris being reintroduced a few days before the official release I was sceptical.
Jaeger LeCoultre nailed it! What a beauty. And about time they celebrated this iconic diver.

The MemovoxJaeger LeCoultre Polaris Memovox SIHH 2018

And the good looking golden chronographJaeger LeCoultre Polaris Chronograph Gold SIHH 2018

A. Lange & Söhne

While everyone was talking about the new and groundbreaking triple split I set my eyes on a classic beauty. First I want to say that I cannot be objective when it comes to A. Lange & Söhne. I love what they are trying to do. Making classic after classic and always with an eye for developing new and complicated movements. Always true to their design language and philosophy. You may call them conservative, but I find them to be nothing but uncompromising.

Well, the new Saxonia Moon Phase is nothing but beautiful. It comes in both white and pink gold.alangesohne saxonia moon phase sihh 2018

Another personal favourite was the new 1815 chronograph. I have said it many times. I love that watch.alangesohne 1815 chronograph sihh 2018

And I have to have the triple split in here. Front may look unsuspicious at first glance but the back reveals a complicated watch. Exactly what I am talking about. Design is classic, complication is groundbreaking.alangesohne triple split sihh 2018

alangesohne triple split back sihh 2018

Girard Perregaux

I have to say that I knew nothing about this brand before SIHH. Nothing.
Of course I had seen pictures and had heard about the brand, but I had never touched one, and I had never really buried myself in the details.
I found the Laureato Ceramic Skeleton to be very interesting. The Laureato is a classic GP design, but in the all black ceramic dress and light as a feather it was a nice acquaintance.GP Girard Perregaux Laureato Skeleton Ceramic SIHH 2018

Audemars Piguet

Already trapped in their own Royal Oak they did not release anything but this year. Not of importance anyway. I have no idea what happened to the rest of the references from this respected manufacture.
Still they continue to develop this line of watches with new technical achievements every year.

As with many of the other brands rumors started going in the days before SIHH and pictures of the novelties were revealed. I was once again sceptical before I had my appointment with AP.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the Royal Oak Offshore. Even though I liked the reedition of the 1993 model of the Offshore my heart skipped a beat when I saw the new case and bezel on the Tourbillon Chronograph. Audemars Piguet is one of the houses that bring us contemporary design features and they are constantly reinterpreting their classic Royal Oak. Watch nerds find this irritating, but I find it refreshing. At least for Audemars Piguet. This has been a strategic direction for them with the Royal Oak for the last few decades. And I like their Rock’n Roll attitude towards their heritage.
I guess similar stunts for the Patek Philippe Nautilus would be heavily frowned upon, even by me.

Audemars Piguet SIHH 2018 Royal Oak Offshore Tourbillon Chronograph

Audemars Piguet SIHH 2018 Royal Oak Offshore Tourbillon Chronograph

The Offshore Chronograph in camo colors was interesting in the flesh.Audemars Piguet Offshore Camo

And of course the RD2 – the 6.3 mm thick perpetual calendar.Audemars Piguet RD2 SIHH 2018

Vacheron Constantin

To finish off with my choice for Best in Show 2018 – the introduction of a new line from Vacheron Constantin – Fiftysix.
Inspired by the ref.6073 from 1956 (of course) they now offer a 40 mm rounded case and almost sector like dials on this new lineup. This was really a much needed facelift to their Quai de l’ile models. I never could swallow that case. In my opinion they now have a much more elegant watch with the elegance I expect from the maison.

Here is the Complete Calendar in pink gold.Vacheron Constantin Fiftysix 56 complete calendar sihh 2018

And the Day Date in steel.Vacheron Constantin Fiftysix 56 day date sihh 2018

That pretty much sums it up. Remember to follow my Instagram for pictures of all the great watches from this year.
And visit my book store.

When most watch collectors talk about the IWC Ingenieur series they think about the handsome Gerald Genta designed Collection SL from 1976 onwards and moving into their modern and sometimes obnoxiously large and technical chronographs. To me IWC’s most important Ingenieur’s were produced 20 years earlier.

I guess many of you know the feeling of falling in love. There is nothing like the tingling feeling and the mixture of anxiety and happiness when you see someone you love, and when I first laid eyes on a vintage IWC Ingenieur ref. 666 – that was how I felt. I know it sounds stupid, but that was it. Watches had been a hobby for a long time, but this watch spoke to me on a level I had not yet experienced. I cannot explain why exactly this model was so interesting to me at that time, or why it made me feel like I did.
Back in 2003 or 2004 I had just started to explore the vintage watch world and I came across this ref. 666. It was too expensive for me at that time but I started to research these older IWC Ingenieur watches.

IWC Ingenieur models

Ref. 666

IWC Ingenieur 3570 866 3233 666

In 1954 the first IWC Ingenieur saw the light of day with the new Cal. 85x movements. It was a pretty modest looking wristwatch, but with the real value on the inside of the case.

These post-war years at the brink of the space age was the era of science. White coats and laboratory’s was the perfect picture of the new age. IWC had for many years been in the forefront of the technical advance of watchmaking with Albert Pellaton running their technical department. So it was only natural to name a family of watches after the rock stars of science, the engineers.

Right after the second world war IWC had made a Pilots watch, the Mark XI, with a manual movement Cal. 89. This movement is known for being super reliable and sturdy. Also this was the first model to have an inner case made of soft iron, to shield the movement from magnetic fields. As you may know, magnetism may interfere with the reliability of the timekeeping properties of a watch.
Taking inspiration from this technical and reliable centre seconds movement, IWC developed the Cal. 852 (no-date) and 8521 (date) in 1953.
Of course all of this was an ingenious marketing strategy. Hailing the technological age with a watch incorporating new technical innovations made for scientists . IWC was branding the watch as “the super time-piece of modern times”.

To me it was probably the sharp dauphine hands and a simple but timeless dial that triggered my affection for the watch at first. Researching the ref. 666 made the connection stronger as I can really appreciate a sober looking watch with technical innovations. It is also a watch that connect a very interesting period of our history to watchmaking and design.

I never got my ref. 666 back then. What I did get for my collection was the then new ref. 3233.

Ref. 3233

IWC Ingenieur 3570 866 3233 666

In 2008 IWC celebrated its 150th anniversary by releasing a Vintage Collection. This collection was really a contemporary reinterpretation of several classic watch models and of course the Ingenieur was one of them. The 3233 kept the dauphine hands and the sober face of the first generation ref.666. Also the case design was taken from the ref. 666.
On the inside IWC put their new in-house Cal. 80111. Here they further developed the values of the early Ingenieur watches with a new shock-absorbing mechanism. Also pressure resistant to 12 bar.
On the 80111 IWC sadly omitted the anti-magnetic soft iron inner case. This feature was kept for other Ingenieur models with the Cal. 80110. What those watches did not have that the ref. 3233 do, is a sapphire glas back where the beauty of the movement can be seen. This would not have been possible with the soft iron inner case. So I guess it was OK.
The only real downside of the ref. 3233 is the size. It is 42 mm and it is thick. Then again, back in 2008 what watch wasn’t?

Ref 866

IWC Ingenieur 3570 866 3233 666

Above you can see the ref 866. I am not going to say much about this one other than it was produced in a couple of series from 1967 to 1976 with a new movement, the cal. 854x. The one on the picture I borrowed from a fellow collector. It probably have newer hands, but according to catalogues they are correct.

Ref. 3570

IWC Ingenieur 3570 866 3233 666
At SIHH 2017 IWC decided to release the ref.3570. Again a new interpretation of the classic IWC Ingenieur. Although IWC claims this model resembles the Ingenieurs of the 1950s, it looks more like the 1970s ref.866 was the inspiration for the design.
The movement on the inside is a Selitta SW 300 built to IWC standards and then modified by the manufacture. This is a robust and reliable movement. The case back is certainly closed, but there is no mentioning of the anti-magnetic properties anywhere. Lacking this feature is no deal braker to me. I mean – who stays in strong magnetic fields these days. What I do find disappointing is that they chose to replace the classic INGENIEUR on the dial with AUTOMATIC.
The good thing about this watch is that the Ingenieur models have gone back to a classic look in a sleek case. Where the ref 3233 was a bit thick and heavy the ref 3570 is thinner and lighter. All in all this watch is a good move by IWC. I love the classic Ingenieur models, and I love the fact that they have gone back to their roots in the whole line of Ingenieur models.

If you want to investigate your own IWC Ingenieur or if you are looking to get one, there is only two online sources of information that I trust – one being MOEB – and the other one being Frizzelweb.

Read more of our articles about IWC Ingenieurs here

From time to time the watch world sees a new special watch from A.Lange & Söhne that has been given some extra thought.
Not many people would argue with me that A. Lange & Söhne is the best manufacture in the world. And they have an exclusive series of Handwerkskunst watches. These are in reality watches, already in production, that they give something extra of everything. Basically A. Lange & Söhne likes to show off what their artists and craftsmen can possibly do with these handcrafted artisanal watches.

This is the sixth model that A. Lange & Söhne give a particularly artistic decoration of the movement, dial and case. It is always exciting when A. Lange & Söhne give their in-house finishers, engravers and enamel artists an artistic challenge.

Launched at the Geneva Salon back in 2013, the 1815 Rattrapante Perpetual Calendar attracted considerable attention. Housing a perpetual calendar and a double chronograph this watch was initially appreciated for both the classic complications and the pleasing aestethics. At the Grand Prix d’Horlogerie de Genève that same year it won the Grand Complications category. As an added bonus it also won the Public’s Choice Award. 

A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Rattrapante Perpetual Calendar Handwerkskunst

 

The new Handwerkskunst

A classic beauty was exactly what A. Lange & Söhne released in Florence a couple of days ago. I was there to witness the grand unveiling of the new addition to the Handwerkskunst series. It was an event that really showcased the appreciation A. Lange & Söhne have for craftsmanship, or Handwerkskunst if you will.

This is the first model to combine enamel art and engraving on its dial. The craftsmen and women of A. Lange & Söhne have really given us their best with this watch. I find it to be especially desirable that the blue enamel and relief engraved stars on the dial seem to extend the moon phase display onto the dial.
To give an impression of a deep blue dial with light blue stars, a solid white gold dial has been engraved with stars and numerals of different heights. The numerals go flush with the enamel and keep their silver colour. This dial is simply stunning.

A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Rattrapante Perpetual Calendar Handwerkskunst

On the back of the watch there is a cuvette cover that protects the sapphire-crystal caseback. It depicts Luna, the Roman goddes and embodiement of the moon.
Below the sapphire-crystal the engraved stars also come back. This time on the movement. Now done with a mix of relief and tremblage technique that give a quite special surface to the engraved parts. Relief engraving is what bring out the stars, and tremblage engraving is what gives the granular texture to the german silver.

A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Rattrapante Perpetual Calendar Handwerkskunst

In my opinion this new Handwerkskunst is extraordinary. I like the classic look done in an over-the-top finish and with truly masterful craft. Set in a 41,9 mm case it also sits fairly comfortable on the wrist. According to A. Lange & Söhne themselves it is already selling at 290.000 EUR, but it will surely become a collectors dream as it will only be made 20 pieces.

See the last one here (in Norwegian)

Get more from A. Lange & Söhne

And how to build your collection. You can learn the secrets of collecting vintage watches.

Collecting vintage watches is really about emotion. Not all true of course. It is also about money.
I tend to fall in love with objects that I just “need” to own, but as all collectors know, you buy what you can. If I had the money I would definitely get myself a couple of vintage Ferraris. But I don’t.
Life brings heartache, and so does collecting sometimes. You cannot win them all. In that manner collecting truly mimics life. There will be hard times and there will be good times.
And sometimes a little bit of each. As when I was forced to sell a beloved vintage Rolex because of an unexpected bill, and when I had the opportunity to buy that vintage Rolex back after two years.
Still it is the good times that I remember best. As when I found a rare photograph strongly connected to my passion for watches.

Sometimes I find bargains. You know, good watches that are priced ridiculously low. But then again when emotion is involved and I really really want that watch bad. I overpay.
And that is what separates collecting from investing or trading. You pay what you have to, to get that object into your collection. And if you have taste and some knowledge it will always turn out to be a good investment over time. As I tell my wife, the other collectors are crazier than me. There are always someone willing to pay up for a good object.

collecting vintage watches rolex 5513 submariner precomex

Know when to turn your collection around

Someone smarter than me once wrote that “if you are a beginner in collecting vintage watches you have to build your watch collection on what you like, according to your taste and wallet”. I always thought that was a cliché. But suddenly I realised that it’s not. If collecting is truly about emotion, then you need to feel that collection of yours.
So at one point, not so long ago, I terminated my entire collection of watches. I sold out everything. I realised that I had bought watches that other collectors liked, but that I did not really enjoy myself. Of course they were collectable and nice watches. It was a strong and diverse collection and I got a lot of compliments. But the watches did not satisfy me.

This smart guy also wrote that collectors with the very best watches have a focus. One of the nicest collections I have seen is all about vintage diving watches. I also know collectors that only buy Patek Philippe or Omega Speedmasters. It is just amazing how many Speedmasters one man can own.

collecting vintage watches rolex 5513 submariner precomex

Collecting Vintage Watches

My own collection is slowly growing again. And this time with a clear vision. My collecting philosophy is now very simple. Buy what I like, know what I buy, and why. And most importantly, go slow.

In practical life that translates to collecting vintage watches that are as original as possible and buying new watches that speak to me. I like a mixed vintage and new collection as they have different qualities. I try to keep the size down to 42 mm and below, preferably 38-40 mm. And I never buy watches to keep them in the safe. I like to wear my watches for periods of time. A week or two on, and then I move on to the next watch in my collection for a period of time.

I want to start collecting chronographs sometime. I just love a nice chronograph. The engineering of that movement, the look of the dial, the feel of the pushers. Everything with chronographs speak to me as a watch guy.
Unfortunately they are expensive, so at the moment I will buy them only if I come past a good specimen at the right price, but I do not rush it.

When deciding where to go with your own collection I would say you should keep in mind why you would collect. There are plenty of reasons why people collect. Most are emotional, and most of us have the collecting genom. When you figure out the why, you need to figure out the what. What to collect is essential to building a nice and solid collection.
Then you should start doing your research.

Please leave a reply below on why you collect if you already know. It would be a great pleasure to read all the different reasons.

collecting vintage watches rolex 1675 gmt master

Research

Researching and collecting vintage watches are now turning out to be both simpler than ever and more confusing than ever. Online resources have a lot of good information but be ware of forums and know-it-alls who claim to be watch gods.
Personally I have gone back to books, backed by online information. Check our collection of books for sale in the shop.

When buying vintage watches the devil is in the details. And I have two very nice examples to show you. One absolutely original vintage Rolex, and one seemingly original that only a good amount of research will expose. Can you spot the one?

I will tell you about my research for these.
What you see first is a reference 5513 Rolex Submariner from 1977, and the second one is a reference 1675 GMT Master from 1968. Both with correct serial numbers, case back stamps and movements. They both have beautiful matching patina on hands and dial.

 

collecting vintage watches rolex 5513 submariner precomex

collecting vintage watches rolex 1675 gmt master

Most would stop here

Let’s go back to the dials and hands, and it is here you find the crux that separates the two watches.
The 1977 ref 5513 with serial in the 5.0 mil, as on this one, a Mk1 Maxi Dial or Pre Comex dial is correct. The watch you see above has the very rare Pre Comex dial.

A 1968 GMT Master ref 1675 would have Mk1 dial, a “Long E” dial.

According to trustworthy sources Rolex started to produce GMT Master in mid 1968 that had a new larger GMT hand.
So suddenly it is not known whether this particular watch would have had the new handset or the old one.
There is one more detail that says it might have had a small GMT hand back in 1968.

The dial

Researching the GMT Master is difficult. The dial variations are many and the price range on the watch is much dictated by the dial and the matching hands. You see, collectors find the dial to bee key when collecting vintage watches in general, but when collecting Rolex the dial is essential.

A 1968 would have had a Mk1 dial. This 1675 watch does not have a Mk1 dial, and since the patination matches, this is an indication of a replacement of both hands and dial at one time.
Some sources say that it was popular amongst early GMT Master owners to upgrade their old watch to a new look with the large GMT hand.
After extensive research into dial variations I found a match for the dial. It is an early tritium replacement dial, or service dial if you will.

My guess is that the original owner of this watch changed both watch and hands back in the early 1970s to get the new and modern look to his older watch.

I still would buy both watches. The 1675 would be better with the original dial, but this one with the matching patina is still a great buy.
Boxes and papers is rare to find on these old watches, and brings the price up to astronomical figures. You got to love it!

Please download my checklist for buying and collecting vintage watches so that you can also get your dream watch without getting screwed.

About a week back I traded one of my watches with another collector for his Panerai Luminor 1950 10 Days Automatic GMT Ceramica – PAM 335. 

I had never worn a Panerai before and I was curious about them. Of course I am familiar with the brand and their watches, but ten-twelve years back when I got into watches, I did not like Panerai. And I kept it like that for many years. They were obscenely large and lumpy in my opinion. While I liked the design of the dials, I still found them boring as they all seemed to look alike. I could not get my head around them. A GTG (get-together) with other watch nerds changed that in a millisecond when I laid eyes on three totally different Panerai watches. And now I was curious.

Like a true Panerai nerd – or Panerist as they are called – I will continue only using the reference of the watch – PAM 335.

PAM 335

My first impression of the watch is that it is manly. Like beard and buck knife manly. It is 44 mm excluding the large crown guard that all Luminors have. It is of course all black because of the ceramic material. And with the sapphire crystal dome it builds quite a height. A few seconds later, when the watch hit my wrist for the first time, I was sold.

PAM 335PAM 335

The PAM 335 sits beautifully on my wrist. It is very comfortable. Light, discreet, sporty and very graphic. I am slightly amazed that a watch of this size can be worn so comfortably. Hardcore Panerai nerds will only wear 47 mm watches, but that is just too much for me. I love the fact that you can have the Panerai DNA in a small package and I am eagerly awaiting the new Due casing that is slicker and does not build as much.

Well, back to the PAM 335.

PAM 335

Further on the PAM 335:

What is most striking on this watch is the black ceramic case. Bezel and crown guard is also ceramic. The ceramic material will not scratch easily and will allow you to wear the watch without any concerns. There is also an anti-shock device inside the movement. I am not a fan of buying an expensive watch and locking it away. I don’t do that. So this watch is the perfect beater. It can handle about anything you throw at it. Disclaimer – author is not liable if you decide to throw objects at watch or throw the watch itself 😉

A 10 days power reserve will allow you to forget that you have the watch for 10 days without missing a beat. There are three barrels inside powering this movement, so there is plenty of power. The linear power reserve indicator on the dial is lovely, and that brings up my favorite part of this watch. The dial. It is complex, yet refined. There is something about Panerai that makes them able to fit a lot of complications on the dial without messing it up. Breitling has one or two things to learn here. The fact that they have indicators for 24h, seconds, power reserve, date, a second time zone and time all bundled up in a readable and simple manner is amazing.

I love GMTs in general, and while that is worth a post in itself, I will now concentrate on this watch. The GMT function on this watch is so easy to use. It is practical and foolproof. I also love the seconds reset complication. If you should have the need to set the watch, just pull out the crown, and the seconds will return to zero. Eazy.

This is of course no dress watch, but in the one week I have not found one other negative side to this watch. It runs perfectly and it is rugged. It is top of the line Panerai and you deserve one as well!

pam335-5

Movement

Automatic mechanical in-house P.2003 calibre

8 mm thick, 25 jewels, Glucydur® balance

28,800 alternations/hour.

KIF Parechoc® anti-shock device.

10 days Power reserve

Three barrels

Seconds reset device

296 components

Functions

Hours, Minutes, Small Seconds, Date, GMT, 24h indicator, Power Reserve Indicator, Seconds Reset

Case

Diameter 44mm, Black Ceramic, Water Resistance to 10 bar (~100 metres). Smoked see-through sapphire crystal on the back.

Bezel and crown guard

Black ceramic

Dial

Black sandwich dial with luminous Arabic numerals and hour markers. Date at 3 o’clock, seconds and 24h indicator at 9 o’clock, linear power reserve indicator at 6 o’clock.

Strap

Buffalo, Black, Tone on tone, 24/22 MM Standard

More on the watch at Panerai.

 

Jaeger-LeCoultre recently launched a new Master Memovox Boutique Edition. When I have an opportunity to fondle a totally new watch, then I take it. This particular model is well known to every watch collector out there as the Memovox have been a cult watch since its first appearance in the 1950s.

Known as the iconic alarm clock, the Memovox have followed Jaeger-LeCoultre in many of their model ranges from the 1950s and up until today. The alarm function has been a continuous element showing up in both dress watches and more sporty watches.  Just imagine an underwater alarm clock for diving, or the Memovox Parking, which saves you from getting parking tickets by reminding you when your parking meter time is up.

Originally featuring a double crown and a mobile disc with the desired alarm time shown by a triangular indicator, the Memovox watch made its mark once launched. Its legendary movement, the Jaeger-LeCoultre Calibre 815, was the first automatic movement to boast an alarm function signed by the Grande Maison and has inspired many others since its introduction in 1956.

Memovox Snowdrop

Now celebrating the 60th anniversary of its automatic movement the Boutique Edition Memovox is a very contemporary interpretation of an 1970s Memovox Snowdrop design. A vintage looking blue-tinted dial is balanced out by the contemporary look of its finishes and case. And the Jaeger-LeCoultre Calibre 956 that drives the Master Memovox Boutique Edition is a direct descendent of the original.

Well, how does it really feel?

Hands-On:

First impression is a surprisingly good looking dial. I had seen this watch in pictures and honestly I thought nothing much of it. A boring dial inside a boring case. I was wrong.

The dial is really interesting. It actually feels like there are three dials in one watch. The centre disc has a magnificent deep blue sunburst finish, followed by a matt dark blue hour index and a lighter blue minute index on the outer edge. I am baffled by how the dial just works. Both understated and interesting at the same time. I could spend hours playing with the sunburst centre disc and a lightbulb.

You see how simple joys can keep a monkey occupied.

Master Memovox Boutique Edition

There are two crowns on this watch. The bottom crown is used for winding, as well as setting the time. Setting the alarm function is simple: shift the top crown into neutral position. Then, in position 2, turn this crown in anti-clockwise direction until the desired ring time. In doing so, the mobile disc with its little “retro-style” and famous Memovox indicator triangle turns around the dial to the alarm time.

I don’t know how they do it, but the alarm have a very pure sound.

I have a video on instagram you should see. Remember Volume On.

The new Memovox Boutique Edition has kept all the characteristics of the Memovox Snowdrop. And I kinda like the “retro-style” look and feel. I am glad Jaeger-LeCoultre decided to have a more contemporary design on the stainless steel case.

Master Memovox Boutique Edition

A  deep blue braided cotton was selected by for the strap and it plays nice with the light blue stitching. Further the calfskin lining ensures a nice and comfortable wearing strap.

All in all this new watch is an unexpected surprise from the Jaeger-LeCoultre Maison. And it is priced very comfortably. Now you just need to get your hands on one. Only 500 pcs made and only for sale in one of the 90 or so Jaeger-LeCoultre Boutiques worldwide.

Master Memovox Boutique Edition

 

Memovox Boutique Edition

Reference:

Q141848J

Movement:

Jaeger-LeCoultre Calibre 956

Automatic mechanical movement

Produced, assembled, and decorated by hand

28,800 vibrations per hour

45-hour power-reserve

268 parts • 23 jewels

7.45 mm in height

Functions:

Hours, minutes, second

Date

Alarm

Case:

Stainless steel, polished finish

40 mm in diameter • 14 mm in height

Solid case-back

Water-resistance: 5 bar

Dial:

Inner dial blue sunburst

Outer dial Opaline blue

Hands:

Baton, polished, Super-Luminova

Strap:

Calfskin in Trieste black, blue topstitching

Limitation:

500 watches exclusive to Jaeger-LeCoultre Boutiques

Today is obviously the day for exclusives. A. Lange & Söhne presented a special edition of the LANGE 1 TIME
ZONE honey gold today.

The date 25. october 2016 is no coincidence. It recalls the presentation of the first Lange collection 22 years ago in Dresden. Featuring a subtle detail on the rotating city ring, Central European Time is represented by Dresden.
The LANGE 1 TIME ZONE has ranked among the most popular models of the LANGE 1 watch family since 2005. The clearly organised dial delivers a single-glance reading of home time and the time in a second time zone. The time zone is set with a lateral pusher. It advances the rotating city ring with the 24 place names from west to east. On the ring, Dresden – instead of Berlin as in the standard version – represents Central European Time.

Lange 1 Time Zone honey

Additionally, the hour hand on the small subsidiary dial moves forward by one step with each actuation of the pusher. An ingenious synchronisation mechanism also makes it possible to transfer the zone time on the subsidiary dial to the main dial.
Subtle colour changes in the design of the city ring differentiate it from the standard version. The dots between the city names and GMT are blue instead of red. Now, the previously black peripheral ring of the second time zone has the same blue hue as well.
The case in 18-carat honey gold has a diameter of 41.9 millimetres. The exclusive material is harder than other gold alloys. The lavishly hand-finished manufacture calibre L031.1 is assembled twice and has a power reserve of three days.

Limited to 100 watches, the Dresden edition of the LANGE 1 TIME ZONE is available exclusively in the 17 A. Lange & Söhne boutiques.

Lange 1 Time Zone honey

After relaunching the new Pilot’s Watch collection at SIHH this year, IWC Schaffhausen has now decided to celebrate the collection’s 80th anniversary with something special for the Benelux and Scandinavian market. An exclusive Big Pilot Watch with a Perpetual Calendar. In a very limited edition.

The Big Pilot’s Watch Perpetual Calendar Edition “A Tribute to the 1st IWC Pilot’s Watch” comes in a solid red gold case with a diameter of 46mm and has a slate-grey dial. It is powered by the IWC-manufactured 52610 caliber movement with twin barrels and ceramic movement parts. For this edition, the movement was fitted with luxurious blued screws.

exclusive Big Pilot

Featuring the amazing IWC Perpetual Calendar mechanism, the watch displays the day, date, month, moon phase and year in four digits until 2499 with only a few manual adjustments needed. The efficient Pellaton automatic winding system provides a 7-day power reserve. It’s 18 carat rose gold rotor is engraved with “36” as a reference to how many pieces of this watch were manufactured.

exclusive Big Pilot

“Within the Benelux and the Nordic region, the IWC Big Pilot’s Watch is very popular because of its iconic design. For this reason, we are proud to launch a very special and unique watch which embodies the dream of flying and celebrates the 80th anniversary of this iconic timepiece”, explains Edwin de Vries, IWC Brand Director Benelux & Scandinavia.

With the solid red gold case, the slate-grey dial and the blue alligator leather strap, the watch features a timeless combination of colours and materials. Also, the single moon phase display is rarely seen on a Perpetual Calendar and the blue colour of the sky plays nicely with the blue alligator leather strap.

exclusive Big Pilot

Christian Knoop, Creative Director IWC Schaffhausen, was personally and closely involved in the development of the watch: “From a design perspective, my challenge is to balance our brand’s DNA and to stick to the design codes of IWC, while at the same time trying to create a limited-edition watch that is special, unique and tailored to the taste of a specific market”.

Retailing at € 47.000, – the watch is available at the IWC Boutique in Amsterdam and selected IWC partners within the Benelux and Scandinavia.

Technical Data

Reference:

IWC 5038

Movement:

52610 Manufactured by IWC

Mechanical, Pellaton automatic winding

7 days power reserve

4 Hz (28,800 vibrations/hour) 1

54 jewels

Indications:

Perpetual calendar and moon phase

Power reserve display

Hours, minutes and small hacking seconds

Case:

18K Red gold

46 mm, 15.5 mm thick

Sapphire crystal front and back

Water-resistance tested at a pressure of 6 bar

Dial:

Ardoise dial

Strap:

Blue alligator leather strap

Buckle:

18K red gold folding clasp

Limitation:

36 watches only for Benelux and Scandinavia

iwc calibre 52610

Yesterday A. Lange & Söhne revealed the new Richard Lange Pour le Mérite in a white gold case and black dial limited to only 218 watches. It may look innocent on the outside, but inside there is a mean machine.

Since the revival of A. Lange & Söhne in the autumn of 1994, the exclusive timepieces with the attribute Pour le Mérite have represented the technological avant-garde at A. Lange & Söhne. Each of the four models launched so far is endowed with a fusée-and-chain mechanism. The Richard Lange Pour le Mérite, first introduced in 2009, exemplifies an ambitious tribute to precision in its purest form. The sole objective of its complication is to improve rate accuracy.

Richard Lange Pour le MériteThe fusée-and-chain mechanism guarantees constant torque and thus stability of the amplitude of the balance across the entire power-reserve range. Wrapped around the mainspring barrel, the chain delivers the power of the mainspring to the wheel train via the cone-shaped fusée. This keeps the torque constant. In principle, the mechanism works like the gearing of a bicycle except that the gear ratios are infinitely variable rather than fixed.

The 636-part chain can support a weight of over two kilograms. But to fully exploit the positive effect of the fusée-and-chain device, the product developers added a technical refinement: two separate mechanisms block the winding system before fully wound and fully unwound states. Both prevent the chain – which is only 0.25 millimetres thick and 156 millimetres long – from being overstressed.

The fusée-and-chain transmission causes the fusée to rotate in one direction during the winding process and in the opposite direction when the watch is running. For this reason, it is necessary to ensure that the watch continues to run even when it is being wound. An elaborate planetary gearing inside the fusée maintains the flow of power from the fusée to the movement during the winding phase. It is composed of 38 tiny parts which the watchmaker must fit into the tight 8.6-millimetre inside diameter of the fusée.

All this remains concealed beneath the black dial of the Richard Lange Pour le Mérite. But the most important parts of the fusée-and-chain device are clearly visible through the sapphire-crystal caseback.

Richard Lange Pour le Mérite

Technical Data

Reference:

260.028

Caliber:

L044.1 Lange Manufactured

Mechanical, manual-winding, fusée-and-chain transmission

31.6 mm in diameter, 6.0 mm thick

Approximately 36 hours of power reserve

279 parts (without chain), 636 in chain alone, 33 jewels

Indications:

Hours, minutes Small seconds at 4h30

Case:

White Gold

40,5 mm, 10,5 mm thick

Sapphire crystal caseback

Dial:

Solid Silver- Black

White Roman numerals

Rhodiumed gold hands

Strap:

Hand-stitched black alligator leather

Buckle:

White gold prong buckle

Richard Lange Pour le Mérite

Read more at A. Lange & Söhne